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Hieroglyphic Tales

Hieroglyphic Tales Funny absurd satirical and disturbing these stories are Horace Walpole s most original yet least known writings These short tales can claim to be the first surrealist writings in English and remai

  • Title: Hieroglyphic Tales
  • Author: Horace Walpole Kenneth Gross
  • ISBN: 9781843680598
  • Page: 221
  • Format: Paperback
  • Funny, absurd, satirical, and disturbing these stories are Horace Walpole s most original, yet least known writings These short tales can claim to be the first surrealist writings in English and remain some of the strangest fiction in all literature They were originally published in 1785 in an edition of six copies, all of which Walpole kept for himself An extra story isFunny, absurd, satirical, and disturbing these stories are Horace Walpole s most original, yet least known writings These short tales can claim to be the first surrealist writings in English and remain some of the strangest fiction in all literature They were originally published in 1785 in an edition of six copies, all of which Walpole kept for himself An extra story is included, which was preserved only in manuscript Truly bizarre, Walpole s stories defy the fictional conventions of his day, beginning with an often imitated mock preface explaining that the stories were undoubtedly written a little before the creation of the world, and have ever since been preserved, by oral tradition, in the mountains of Crampcraggiri, an uninhabited island, not yet discovered.

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      221 Horace Walpole Kenneth Gross
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      Posted by:Horace Walpole Kenneth Gross
      Published :2018-05-08T21:41:33+00:00

    1 thought on “Hieroglyphic Tales

    1. GR describes these stories as surreal. Yep, that works. Imagine Robin Williams and Jonathan Winters getting together, riffing on all sorts of topics as only they could. These stories of Walpole's could have come from an improv session with those two great goofy comedians. Walpole would have been right at home with them and more than able to keep up, too!Naturally not everyone likes such manic goings-on, but I can handle a little of it, and these six stories were just the right dose. I often had [...]

    2. Before anyone goes off trying to find a copy of this, Project Gutenberg is offering it as a free ebook and it's only 20 pages. Nothing your office printer can't handle if you don't have an ebook reader.I love the Gothic tradition of writing a story and then the author pretending it's a translation of some ancient manuscript that was found in the library of some unspecified ancient monastery. It's like a mystery of a mystery.Ok, so I've only just started, but the story about the king's 3 daughter [...]

    3. Kind of a mixed bag of writing. Starting off it is excellent and reads like a clever modern sort of twisted pseudo-fairytale adaptation, though it is over 200 years old. The Preface is quite enjoyable, full of entertainingly contradictory explanations of the works origin and purpose. Especially enjoyable is the author's bald statement that he will produce forged classical writings, bury them in Carthage and then dig them up again. Also, The claim that the work will be printed in massive numbers [...]

    4. A quick, enjoyable read. This is a series of (sometimes very) short, satirical stories from the eighteenth century. It's only about 80 pages long, so even if you hate that kind of thing, you can muddle your way through in an hour. Kenneth Gross, in the introduction, describes the stories as "psychotic", but I certainly wouldn't go that far. He also argues that Walpole is more interested in the absurdity of writing a satire, rather than focusing on making a point. This works really well for me, b [...]

    5. Delightful, easily read tales, yet there is also more subtle meaning behind them. On first perusal, some of the tales reminded me of cheerful fluff that I freewrote in high school, which endeared them to me. Looking over them a second time, I liked them even better because there was more to them than the surface surrealism showed.

    6. I recorded this and found two of the stories a bit too.Rabelaisian? tasteless? for comfort. But, on the whole, I was entertained by the surreal nonsense and enjoyed doing the background research on the satirical and other references as I'm infatuated with the eighteenth century at the moment. Some bits convulsed me - it took me several goes to get out "the fair Miss Bob Oliver".

    7. The whole collection can be read in an hour and it's worth the trouble. A couple of the tales are very good, but the best thing about the collection is that it reads like an embryonic Douglas Adams or Monty Python at times. By no means is it fully developed, but "The Hieroglyphic Tales" has its juicy nuggets of random, dry British wit.

    8. I read this collection of stories this afternoon, and I have to say, I enjoyed every bit of it. I had never encountered Mr. Walpole, except as a peripheral cheese purchase topic in Monty Python. I can't wait to see what the "Castle of Ortranto" is like.

    9. Odd, silly tales. I liked the first and last ones best. The last is a thwarted love story between slaves, where at the end she miscarries four puppies, and only then is it revealed that they are dogs.

    10. Read 'The Castle of Otranto', it was quite ok, so I guess it doesn't hurt to explore another Walpole.

    11. Trippy, short and nonsensical but fun. "A True Love Story" had me doing a double-take and cracking up. A fun read for an afternoon.

    12. Stream-of-consciousness fairy tales, with gossip of the day thrown in. Very imaginative. Never published during Walpole's lifetime.

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